OUR Team

Lewis Winks

Director & Facilitator

I am passionate about the role of education in shaping and informing our relationship with the world around us and have worked for over a decade in the envrionmental sector as both practitioner and researcher in multiple roles. I have worked with organisations seeking systemic social change, such as the Centre for Alternative Technology (CAT), and the Field Studies Council at Slapton Ley. I completed my PhD research in early 2018, focusing on realtional aspects of residential outdoor learning.

When not at my desk, I can be found leaping into rivers, hiking on Dartmoor or contemplating the vibrancy of life on the allotment. I remain committed to practical action, outdoor adventure and the importance of a restorative education through which we might fall back in love with this magnificent world.

My current work focuses on supporting educators to work creatively and to infuse their practice with principles of deep sustianability as well as running workshops, facilitation and teaching.

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Isabel Wright

Facilitator

I came to work in land-based, experiential learning after a 30 year career in mainstream teaching, from nursery to secondary, at the point when I had officially retired! In this work I rediscovered the joy of working with children and young people in a context that encourages and enables them to learn through direct experience, to work collaboratively, to pit themselves against challenges that seem too big and to experience the satisfaction of overcoming the odds.

I bring to this work over 25 years of working in the mainstream school system, with children and young people from the ages of 3 to 16. I have taught in mainstream primary schools in inner city London and Sheffield, in both a school and a community nursery and spent 5 years teaching in a secondary school in Tottenham, North London, developing literacy within mainstream teaching across the curriculum. This school had students from all over the world, many of whom had arrived in London as refugees and asylum seekers from war torn countries. At times we had over 50 languages spoken in the school. These were students for whom education represented perhaps their only chance to make a success in a new country and to lift their families out of poverty. As the daughter and granddaughter of refugees myself, I understand that imperative.

My passion in teaching has always been for children and young people to be confident, independent, problem-solving learners, who love learning for its own sake and experience the satisfaction and empowerment of overcoming challenges. Language and literacy are, for me, primary tools in creating successful learners – to be able to present yourself and your ideas with confidence and competence opens doors to relationships and opportunities. I have worked as a literacy advisory teacher in London, supporting whole school improvement as well teaching within the classroom. I also trained as a Reading Recovery Teacher Leader, training teachers to work with children who struggle to learn to read and write, as well as always teaching children myself. Working with children who had given up on themselves (because others didn’t believe they could learn), and seeing them not only catch up but also become independent, enthusiastic learners, reminded me again and again that we can all learn and that, if someone is not learning, it is simply because we haven’t yet worked out how to teach them.

My wide experience of working in schools supports conversations with teachers who bring their students to On the Hill, about how they can link the experiences of the residential to their on-going work in school. Many teachers and students use memories and metaphors from the residentials to support students who are finding learning difficult. Remembering what they have achieved in one context reinforces students’ resilience and belief that they can overcome challenges in other contexts.

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John Marshall

Gardender & Facilitator

I've worked alongside Jo and Tina to get this exciting new project up and running from spring 2017,  And I'm truly loving it!

I'm usually found up in the garden, in the orchards attending to the new apple trees we have planted. If you don't find me there, I'll be mowing the garden green areas or raising the beds in the circular garden we created back in the spring last year and which already have some amazing produce growing!


I'm very excited to be working with On The Hill to keep growing produce, working with young people  out in the elements, and making a difference to the world. It's a pleasure to be working alongside such an amazing team and to be making more and more vibrant plans for this space.

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Rosie Fellows

Director & Facilitator

It is a real pleasure to be supporting the growth of On the Hill as a Director and using my skill set to help shape us as an organisation, working to values I hold close; of nurturing relationship to self, others and our natural world, while asking challenging questions of each.

I have worked with young people and on multi-disciplinary teams in a diverse range of settings  for over 20 years, beginning my practice in South Devon with youth support work and drama facilitation.

I gained my BSC in Youth Work Practice followed by a PGCE in Lifelong Learning while living and working in Bristol, where I worked for both third sector and statutory services. For many years I ran the Prince’s Trust Team programme at City of Bristol College and managed other youth volunteering and peer mentoring projects; with young parents, and supporting young people in crisis and with their progression.  I have a strong commitment to facilitating youth participation on projects, and encouraging a sense of agency amongst young people. I have developed my teaching practice in a medley of settings; from secondary schools delivering sex and relationships education, to FE colleges, foundation learning settings to secure children’s homes, and in the outdoor environment.

My current role at Bath Spa University sees me working on a partnership programme to support widening participation to Higher Education.

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We work with a diverse range of facilitators and educators on our programmes. Each of our staff are highly experienced and bring their own unique skills and approaches to our work. Below are a selection of our regular facilitators - scroll down to learn more about our team.

Jo Clark

Director & Facilitator

Underpinning my work in education is the deeply held belief that it is the duty of Educators to do everything they can to encourage children to develop a responsible, loving and caring relationship with the natural and gardened world. By doing this, we help them to understand that our well being is inextricably linked to the rest of the life on Earth. 

My lifelong investigation into how children truly learn about the world they inhabit began in my own childhood. Growing up on a traditional farm in Devon offered me a foundation in many practical skills, including animal and plant husbandry. As a young man, I spent 11 years in Andalusia, bringing up my own children, building, farming and performing street theatre. During this time I worked alongside many people of all ages and backgrounds. I became inspired by the diversity of modes of learning that I witnessed, and developed a yearning to explore a new education.

Since then I have worked as an outdoor learning Teacher in Steiner schools for ten years then lead a land-based learning initiative at Embercombe for 10 years, worked as an outdoor learning consultant and now I lead programs and run the farm at Oxen Park.

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Tina Sharman

Director & Facilitator

Tina spent ten years living within a land based social enterprise (www.embercombe.org), working throughout many realms of the organization as well as with groups and individuals, supporting them to move more fully towards the life that is uniquely theirs to continually discover, express and celebrate.

She brings this experience to On the Hill and Oxen Park, endeavoring to meet the challenge and extraordinary privilege that stewardship of an area of land seems to her to require at this time, guided by the particular skills and loves of the individuals involved.

She also carries forward a lived understanding of how engagement with the outdoor environment, using natural materials, and encouraging the deepening of relationship to each other and with ourselves can nourish and resource our lives.

She is a breathwork practitioner, coach, potter, plays with an interactive theatre group and loves the polytunnel.

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Jo Clark

Director & Facilitator

Underpinning my work in education is the deeply held belief that it is the duty of Educators to do everything they can to encourage children to develop a responsible, loving and caring relationship with the natural and gardened world. By doing this, we help them to understand that our well being is inextricably linked to the rest of the life on Earth. 

My lifelong investigation into how children truly learn about the world they inhabit began in my own childhood. Growing up on a traditional farm in Devon offered me a foundation in many practical skills, including animal and plant husbandry. As a young man, I spent 11 years in Andalusia, bringing up my own children, building, farming and performing street theatre. During this time I worked alongside many people of all ages and backgrounds. I became inspired by the diversity of modes of learning that I witnessed, and developed a yearning to explore a new education.

Since then I have worked as an outdoor learning Teacher in Steiner schools for ten years then lead a land-based learning initiative at Embercombe for 10 years, worked as an outdoor learning consultant and now I lead programs and run the farm at Oxen Park.

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